Five Things Realtors Should Know About the Self-Directed IRA

A Self-Directed IRA is a powerful tool for aspiring retirees to build wealth by focusing on the assets they want to focus on. One such asset class: real estate. That is why it is so vital for realtors who want to know their market to understand that some real estate investors might be looking for the next great real estate opportunity as part of their retirement strategy.

With that in mind, we have taken some key facts about the Self-Directed IRA that every realtor should know. Here are what realtors should know about this unique retirement arrangement:

  1. The Self-Directed IRA Allows for Real Estate Investing

This may be one of the most basic and fundamental ways to understand the Self-Directed IRA: the IRS does not have many restrictions when it comes to the investment types held in an IRA. A Self-Directed IRA holder can choose from assets as diverse as real estate and precious metals. It is not difficult to see how this might be relevant for a realtor.

Do not discount a potential client because they are using a Self-Directed IRA as a way to build retirement wealth. These investors may actually prove to be more savvy and knowledgeable about real estate than you might have imagined; they are just going about their real estate investing in a way that is not always “traditional.”

  1. Self-Directed IRAs Allow for Non-Recourse Financing

When you think about an ideal client—someone who could potentially invest in real estate now—you might not think of someone who is looking to make a retirement investment. That is because typically, many people do not see loans and leverage as a way to build a retirement nest egg. But it is possible using a Self-Directed IRA—real estate investors can use non-recourse financing to ensure that they utilize leverage to make a real estate investment. That means that even if a client does not necessarily have the current funds to make the investment you might be pointing out to them, they might still be capable of making it using a Self-Directed IRA.

  1. Real Estate Grows Inside a Retirement Account Tax-Free

If you need a way to push the incentives of investing in real estate, a retirement account is the way to go. Rental income and sales proceeds will go into the Self-Directed IRA, not to the individual, which means they can then grow tax-free. This gives you, as a realtor, the ability to save your clients a lot of money simply by broaching the subject of the Self-Directed IRA as an investment option. And those who look at real estate as a pure investment will be excited to know that they can guarantee themselves higher returns simply by going about it the right way.

  1. There are Restrictions, but Investment Real Estate is the Key

No, a client cannot invest in their personal home through a Self-Directed IRA. That means they cannot use real estate they hold within this retirement account for personal needs. However, just about any other type of investment real estate is perfectly acceptable—including single-family homes, commercial property, and even apartment buildings.

  1. Diversification is the Key to Success

Anyone looking to expand their retirement portfolio and build their wealth on solid foundations of diversification are looking for a way out of 100% stocks and bonds. A Self-Directed IRA presents exactly that opportunity. Investing in real estate—or even other options like precious metals—affords individuals the right to build a wide net in their quest for retirement success.

Interested in learning more about how you can help your clients with your knowledge of Self-Directed IRAs? Give us a call at 866-7500-IRA or visit www.AmericanIRA.com

Investing in Tax Liens with Self-Directed IRAs

Most of you who are reading this article are probably already familiar with Self-Directed IRAs. These marvelous vehicles for retirement savings have been around for several decades and have become a staple in the retirement portfolios of millions of Americans. But there is a good chance you have not heard of using tax liens with Self-Directed IRAs.

In fact, you might not know much about Self-Directed IRAs and may be wondering why you should even be interested in them. Well, they are not drastically different from the Traditional IRA, but they can be more powerful and comprehensive: more powerful because you have added control over your investments and more comprehensive because you have a wider range of investment options from which to choose.

Case in point: tax liens. Most IRA custodians limit your investment choices to mutual funds, individual stocks and bonds, and certificates of deposit (CDs). Investing in tax liens would not be allowed. With a Self-Directed IRA, however, alternative investments like gold, real estate, private stock, and tax liens are available to provide additional diversification for your retirement portfolio. Let’s take a closer look at tax liens for Self-Directed IRAs.

What is a tax lien?

Because local governments count on tax revenues to fund services, they may file a lien against the assets (typically real estate) of any individual who has fallen behind in tax payments. Then, instead of waiting until an unknown future date to collect the funds, the government agency will sell the lien at a public auction.  The returns can be very appealing.  For example, South Carolina offers a 12% return and Texas offers up to a 50% return.

Investors can bid on these liens at auction and, if they are successful, can earn a good return on a secure investment. The government agency raises immediate revenues, and the investor receives the legal right to accept tax payment, plus interest, from the delinquent property owner. The interest rate is determined during the bidding.  Click here to download our free guide about investing in tax liens.

What is the process of purchasing a tax lien?

States and counties often host websites that contain a list of available properties that include pictures and other pertinent information. Investors are responsible for evaluating the value of the tax lien and also the asset that supports its value. Investors place their bids in the auction and either write a check for the transaction or make arrangements with the auctioneer to pay from their Self-Directed IRA account.

Certain auctions may require buyers to fund their transactions faster than a self-directed account custodian can review and approve the transaction. The solution for this is to fund an escrow account in advance, which involves filing for a trust EIN and opening the account using the EIN instead of a social security number.

By now it should be evident that unless you are an experienced tax lien investor, you should be seeking the help of a professional. Tax liens are one of those alternative investments that make sense in a Self-Directed IRA, so it should also make sense to ensure that the process of obtaining them goes as smoothly as possible.

Once you have purchased the tax liens, you become the lienholder and wait for the delinquent taxpayer to pay the taxes. If the taxpayer fails to pay, at some point you will legally be allowed to enforce collection through foreclosure. Some laws govern the foreclosure process so, once again, it is crucial that you have professional assistance.

What are the benefits to the investor?  

In most cases, the investor is paid back all of the property taxes plus any interest that has accumulated. Sometimes, however, the property owner does not pay the taxes and the lienholder can sell the property at the best price available in the real estate market.

Tax liens with Self-Directed IRAs take the first position in most states, which makes them a secure investment, and the higher-than-normal interest rates that are paid on the liens make them preferable to CDs and treasury bonds.

Whether an investor ends up collecting interest on the debt or receives equity through foreclosure, the portfolio diversification that comes from investing in tax liens has to be considered as one of the prime benefits to a Self-Directed IRA.

We can help you get started

At American IRA, we have the tax lien professionals you need. With our simplified process, you can easily take care of your tax lien investing and tax sales transactions.

For more information on Tax Liens with Self-Directed IRAs, call us today at 866-7500-IRA (472) or visit us at www.AmericanIRA.com.  You can also click here for more information about tax liens.

Self-Directed Real Estate IRA Update – Criminal Background Checks and the Law

If you are a Self-Directed Real Estate IRA investor, it is not just tax laws governing retirement accounts you must worry about. There is a whole set of landlord-tenant laws you need to be aware of as well – and they can vary by jurisdiction.

For example, most Real Estate IRA investors have taken for granted that they will be able to run criminal background checks on applicants and screen out people with criminal histories. After all, these tenants pose a potential risk to neighbors, roommates and even potentially to the landlord.

That is not universally the case. For example, the city of Seattle made it illegal last year for property owners to decline to rent to applicants because of a criminal history. They made it a crime for landlords to even run a criminal background check.

The law, which the City Council passed unanimously last August, prohibits landlords from refusing to lease housing to individuals on the basis of their criminal history, except where the tenant is on a sexual offenders’ registry for a conviction received as an adult, and the landlord is able to provide a legitimate business reason for the discrimination.

The law also prohibits landlords from even asking about prior criminal records or creating blanket policies against renting to those with criminal histories or instructing their property managers and agents to turn down their applications. Advertisements with discriminatory language are also prohibited. Fines range from $10,000 for a first offense up to $55,000 for repeat offenders

This month, a group of small landlords affiliated with the Rental Housing Association of Washington is filing suit against the City of Seattle, arguing that the Fair Chance Housing Ordinance is unconstitutional. The RHA represents the interests of Real Estate IRA investors and those who own rental real estate directly, outside of retirement accounts. The Pacific Legal Foundation is providing legal representation.

The argument is that the ordinance is a violation of landlord free speech and due process rights. The Association also claims that the City Council.

The City states that they believe the ordinance in question is not unconstitutional and will defend it in court.

Until the Association prevails in the suit, the ban on discriminating against convicted criminals remains in force.

It is not just a Seattle issue: In 2016, the U.S. Department Housing and Urban Development began sending warning shots against landlords: ““A policy or practice that denies housing to anyone with a prior arrest or any kind of criminal conviction cannot be justified,” wrote HUD general counsel Helen Kanovsky for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

The current HUD Administration seems to be friendlier to landlords, small businesses and investors.

It is a good idea for Self-Directed IRA investors to stay in close touch with an experienced landlord-tenant law attorney licensed in all states in which you own rental properties. Do not get blindsided by a law or ordinance you did not know about. Understand the law at the federal, state and municipal levels. And maintain adequate landlord insurance to protect you against problems.

For more information on Self-Directed IRAs, call us today at 866-7500-IRA (472). Or visit us at www.AmericanIRA.com and download our guide to Real Estate IRA investing.

Americans Need to Save More. Here is How Self-Directed IRAs can Help.

Millions of Americans need to do more to prepare for a secure retirement. Those are the results of the newly-released 2018 Planning and Progress Study from Northwestern Mutual. Nearly 8 out of 10 Americans are concerned about their own retirement security, and more than two thirds are concerned about outliving their retirement savings.  Self-Directed IRAs may be the key to securing a nice retirement.

Key Findings:

  • One out of five Americans have no retirement savings whatsoever.
  • 33 percent of Baby Boomers – now nearing or entering their retirement age, have $25,000 or less in retirement savings.
  • Three out of four Americans believe it is only “somewhat likely” or “not at all likely” that Social Security will be there for them in retirement.
  • Almost half of all Americans have not taken any steps to help ensure they will outlive their retirement assets.

More Americans expect to be working longer into their traditional retirement years. Nearly 4 in 10 (38 percent) expect to be working at least to age 70 – well past the traditional retirement ages of 60 to 65 years. Only 33 percent expect to be able to retire during that traditional age range.

Additionally, fully 55 percent of respondents – more than half – expect they will need to work past age 65, with nearly three quarters of them reporting insufficient savings as the primary driver of the decision to keep working. Other contributing factors include the expectation that Social Security will not be around for them in its present form, and concerns over increasing health care and long-term care costs.

You can read more about the study and its methodology here.

What To Do About It

The gap between retirement income needs and the capacity of individuals’ assets to generate retirement income is substantial. Experts recommend increasing savings and investment. Here are some of the things you can do to help maximize the chances of having a secure, successful retirement:

1.)  Start saving early. The sooner you begin saving in earnest, the more compounding can work in your favor, and the less investment risk you will need to take to meet your retirement income needs.

2.)  Maximize tax-advantaged saving and investing opportunities. Save as much as you can in Self-Directed IRAs, Self-Directed Solo 401(K)s, Thrift Savings Plans and other tax-favored account types. If you have self-employment income or own a business, start a retirement plan of your own, and contribute as much as you can.

3.)  Start a Self-Directed IRA. These increasingly popular Self-Directed IRAs are designed to enable investors to expose themselves to a wider variety of asset classes not readily available from traditional investment companies, which focus on stocks, bonds, mutual funds and annuities. Self-Directed IRAs enable you to take direct ownership of hand-selected real estate, gold and precious metals, tax liens and certificates, private placements, venture capital and other assets not normally available from retail brokerages and investment companies.

4.)  Own real estate. Real estate offers a powerful combination of current income, increasing income potential, capital appreciation, leverage and downside risk protection. We recommend owning at least some real estate within a Self-Directed Real Estate IRA, which allows for both income and capital appreciation on a tax-deferred basis, or in the case of Self-Directed Roth IRA accounts, tax-free.

5.)  Reduce the fees you pay. The average actively-managed mutual fund can sap your portfolio of 20 percent or more of its value over a lifetime, thanks to high mutual fund expense ratios and other hidden transactions. Consider migrating some of your assets to index funds and pull assets from accounts with expensive “wrap” fees and assets-under-management fees to firms that charge a much more reasonable flat rate for services rendered. For example, if you are a long-term, buy-and-hold investor, it makes little sense to subsidize other investors’ trading by paying a high expense ratio, which can eat away at your retirement nest egg like termites.

This can cost thousands of dollars per year in a good-sized investment portfolio. A flat rate, menu-based fee schedule may cost a small fraction of the fees and expenses you’re currently paying to a traditional broker or investment company.

6.)  Start taking positive steps today. For example, open a Self-Directed IRA or Real Estate IRA with American IRA, LLC. American IRA is one of America’s leading providers of administrative services for Self-Directed IRAs of all stripes. Once your account is open and funded, it is very easy to purchase assets – including entire houses and apartment buildings – for your retirement portfolio.

To get started, call us today at 866-7500-IRA (472) or visit us on the Web at www.AmericanIRA.com.

Self-Directed Solo 401(K)

When saving for retirement, many people use a Self-Directed Solo 401(K) plan. This plan is designed particularly for small businesses which employ only themselves and their spouse.

Since passage of the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Act of 2001 (EGTRRA) Solo 401(K) plans became a much better choice for sole proprietorships. This law allows one to reap all of the benefits of Traditional 401(K) plans with a number of significant advantages.

 

The Self-Directed Solo 401(K) allows you to put aside more money for retirement

Under the 2018 rules, a Traditional IRA only allows someone to contribute a maximum of $5,500 annually until the age of 50 or $6,500 50+. However, a Self-Directed Solo 401(K) is more generous. Under the age of 50, the Self-Directed Solo 401K) plan allows you to contribute a maximum of $18,500 annually, and $24,500 each year after then. Perhaps the most significant advantage to a Solo 401(K) is the permitted profit-sharing contribution. Your business can also make a profit-sharing contribution of 20%, until a combined maximum limit of $55,000 is reached. After the age of 50, a $6,000 “catch-up” contribution can be added which increases the combined maximum amount to $61,000. If your spouse also contributes to the business, you can both contribute funds into your own accounts, which effectively doubles all of these limits.

Another benefit of a Self-Directed Solo 401(K) is a Self-Directed Roth IRA Option, which allows you to make after-tax contributions, unlike the Traditional Self-Directed 401(K) which only permits pre-tax contributions.

 

Eligibility Requirement for a Self-Directed Solo 401(K)

In order to qualify for a Self-Directed Solo 401(K), your business may have no other full-time employees besides you and your spouse. The business also must pay you a salary or wage as an individual.  The deadline for establishing a Solo 401(K) plan is the last day of your business’s tax year (December 31, for a calendar tax year). However, if the business is incorporated, you would probably want to form your Self-Directed Solo 401(K) early in the year because you cannot contribute any income which is not earned that year before the Solo 401(K) was formed.

 

Permitted Investments for a Self-Directed Solo 401(K)

Your Self-Directed Solo 401(K) plan can invest in almost anything. This allows you to both diversify your investments or and maximize returns – whichever is more important to you.

 

Tax Advantages of a Self-Directed Solo 401(K)

If you invest funds from your Self-Directed Solo 401(K) in real estate, there are significant tax advantages. When purchasing real estate, you can use nonrecourse leverage which avoids UDFI rules and is exempt from UBTI taxes. This is a substantial savings, as the UBTI tax is approximately 40% for 2018.

There are also tax deductions which can be claimed when using a Self-Directed Solo 401(K). Because you are paying for the Solo 401(K) with business funds, you could claim the cost of the plan as a tax deduction.

 

You can borrow money from your Self-Directed Solo 401(K)

Unlike many other retirement plans like Self-Directed Traditional IRA plans, which are forbidden from making loans, you can borrow money from your Self-Directed Solo 401(K). This can be up to $50,000 or 50% of your account value. There are no restrictions on the use of these funds. An additional benefit to this type of loan is the interest rate, which is essentially 0%, since you are both the lender and the borrower.

For more information on Self-Directed IRAs or Self-Directed Solo 401(K)s, call us today at 866-7500-IRA (472) or visit us at www.AmericanIRA.com.

Self-Directed IRA Private Lending

What is Self-Directed IRA Private Lending?

One of the many lesser known but lucrative ways to benefit from your Self-Directed IRA is through private lending. Perhaps the best “alternative asset” to is providing others with the capital to make major purchases such as real estate. Instead of a bank collecting the interest, the Self-Directed IRA makes this profit. Many loans made by Self-Directed IRAs are for purchasing real estate. Some people who may be creditworthy but still are unable to secure financing from a bank will look for other sources for loans. They might not really be such bad risks, but since banks have tightened up their guidelines, such individuals will have to find alternative sources for financing. Some examples of these people who may be unable to qualify for traditional loans are the self-employed or those who earn their income from commissions. However, it is vitally important to do your own due diligence into the potential borrower. Once you determine this person is an acceptable risk, you can proceed with the transaction.

The Self-Directed IRA holder can select the borrower, interest rate, security (which may be real estate, businesses or another asset you agree on) as well as all other terms of the loan such as length and frequency of payment. Like all investments, there is a risk to Self-Directed IRA Lending. The borrower may have not been able to arrange for financing due to legitimate reasons such his credit history, and possibly be unable or unwilling to pay. Should the worst happen, and the borrower fail to honor his/her commitment, you will still have the agreed-upon security to fall back on. If you are willing to take a potentially serious chance in exchange for more income, you can provide an unsecured loan. This will usually generate a higher interest rate, but it can also represent a serious risk because it is not backed by any collateral.

Another type of borrower could be more an entity which wants to raise capital while using a promissory note with company stock as the collateral. The risk to you with this type of secured note is that the value of the collateral is directly impacted by the success or the failure of the company that has issued the note

 

Benefits of Self-Directed IRA Private Lending

The benefits of Self-Directed IRA Lending are many and varied. Some of these advantages are another way to diversify your investments and create a pre-established return on your money. The loan’s principal and interest payments provide a steady, secure income stream to your Self-Directed IRA. You are essentially investing in both the borrower and the asset pledged as security, since this is ultimately available in the event of a default on the loan.

Another significant advantage of private lending with a Self-Directed IRA comes at tax time. Profits from this lending still benefit from all of an IRA. All gains from this type of investment are tax-deferred until a distribution is taken from your Self-Directed IRA. An additional advantage of a Self-Directed IRA is the ability to adjust the timing of these distributions if you have more than one retirement account, as long as you remove enough funds in total. The distributions from your retirement accounts are not required until the IRA owner reaches the age of 70 1/2. Even better, if you have a Self-Directed Roth IRA, these profits are tax-free permanently.

 

Regulations of Self-Directed IRA Private Lending

The first essential regulation regarding IRA lending is that it must be a Self-Directed IRA. One of the principal regulations regarding Self-Directed IRA Lending must already be in place. The IRA is a separate legal entity and not your personal finances. All of the necessary paperwork involved with lending money from your Self-Directed IRA will have its own legal name.  It is the IRA itself, and not you, who is making the loan. Therefore, all income produced from this transaction goes directly into the Self-Directed IRA.

Another rule for private lending from your Self-Directed IRA is that the loan must be for a real economic transaction. Additionally, funds from a Self-Directed IRA can only be lent to a “non-disqualified person.”  Certain family members are disqualified people. They include you, your spouse, parents, grandparents, children, etc. However, other relatives such as siblings, cousins, nieces and nephews, as well as aunts and uncles are non-disqualified people.

For more information on Self-Directed IRAs, call us today at 866-7500-IRA (472) or visit us at www.AmericanIRA.com.

The Advantages and Regulations for Self-Directed Gold IRAs

There are many benefits to Self-Directed IRAs, the chief of which is allowing you to invest in many ways. One excellent example of this is the Self-Directed Gold IRA. Although certain other precious metals can be used in this type of Self-Directed IRA, gold is by far the most common.

Perhaps you have heard the old saying “good as gold” when referring to something that is both secure and valuable. When it comes to investing, that old saying can certainly be true. In times of uncertainty, gold has always been the ultimate safe harbor.

Your investment can be held in either gold company stock or exchange traded funds that track a gold index as well as physical gold. Holding the actual metal provides the ultimate amount of control, eliminating any risk of the fund getting into trouble.

 

Advantages of Self-Directed Gold IRAs

There are a number of advantages to using Self-Directed Gold IRAs. The most important is the security that comes with gold, perhaps the planet’s oldest store of value. Like all investments, gold prices will fluctuate, but having a portion of your assets invested in gold is perhaps the safest bet. Gold prices frequently move in the opposite direction of paper assets, meaning if much of your portfolio falls in value, it will provide a cushion against those losses. Since the financial crisis of 2008 and the resulting Great RecessionSelf-Directed Gold IRAs have become much more popular. Self-Directed Gold IRAs also provide an insurance policy against inflation.

 

The Regulations Governing Self-Directed Gold IRAs

Self-Directed Gold IRAs can are subject to the same regulations as other types of Self-Directed IRAs with some additional rules specific to gold or other precious metals. Some of these regulations involve the trustee requirements, types of metal permitted and storage plans.

 

Trustee Requirements for Self-Directed Gold IRAs

Just like all other Self-Directed IRAs, in order to comply with IRS requirements, a Self-Directed Gold IRA must be held by a U.S. trustee. Therefore, legally speaking, precious metals in a Self-Directed IRA are in the custody of the trustee or custodian, not the IRA owner. According to the IRS, “A trustee or custodian must be a bank, a federally insured credit union, a savings and loan association, or an entity approved by the IRS to act as trustee or custodian.”

 

Types of Gold Which Can be Used for Self-Directed Gold IRAs

If you choose to hold gold in physical form, it may be either in bullion or coins, and there are specific requirements for each. These regulations are set by everyone’s favorite organization, the Internal Revenue Service. Gold held as bullion must meet certain requirement standards. It must be a fineness level of .9950% and come from a COMEX or NYMEX approved refiner. Certain types of gold coins are also permissible. Only the certain coins are allowed, which excludes a number of “collectable” coins. The permitted coins include:

 

Types of Storage Plans for Self-Directed Gold IRAs

There are two types of permitted storage plans for gold which is held in the Self-Directed IRA. They are known as either national storage plans or local storage plans.

When using a national storage plan the gold is sent directly to an approved national depository. When using this method, the national facility is responsible for security, but you never see your gold because it is sent directly to the facility and not your trustee.

When using a local storage plan, your gold is sent to the manager of the Self-Directed IRA and you choose where to store it, provided the site meets certain requirements.

 

Costs Involved When Using Self-Directed Gold IRAs

Owning gold in a Self-Directed Gold IRA does come with some special expenses, in addition to those associated with all other types of Self-Directed IRAs. Some of these charges that an investor will have to pay include the seller’s fee, custodian fee and storage fees. The seller’s fee (or markup) can vary depending on what type of gold you purchase, such as bullion or coins. The custodian fees are an annual expense which may be higher for Self-Directed IRAs than other types of accounts. There are also the annual storage fees which are charged by the storage facility where your gold is kept.

 

Required Distributions from Self-Directed Gold IRAs

Just as with Traditional IRAs, an investor must start to take required minimum distributions, or RMDs, once they turn 70½. Account holders are required to remove a portion of assets from their Self-Directed IRAs each year as a distribution, so the government can begin collecting taxes on your savings. If you have multiple Traditional IRAs you can “aggregate” your distributions from different accounts, possibly allowing you to keep more in the Self-Directed Gold IRA provided you remove a sufficient amount in total.

When you begin making distributions from your Self-Directed Gold IRA, you can sell some of the gold and withdraw the money as cash. You can also take a “distribution in-kind” and receive the physical gold itself and be taxed accordingly.

For more information on Self-Directed IRAs or Self-Directed Gold IRAs, call us today at 866-7500-IRA (472) or visit us at www.AmericanIRA.com.

The 5 Best Suburbs in the SouthEast for Self-Directed Real Estate IRA Owners to Retire To

Real Estate IRA investors and property owners looking to relocate after retirement know the south has some of the best towns in the county to live.  Many Self-Directed IRA owners are interested in keeping their investments close to their retirement destination.

Real Estate IRA owners are looking for homes at a reasonable price, relative to rental yields, stable or improving employment prospects, and the ability to get into a new property without having to commit $1 million or more into an overheated housing market.

Additionally, it is nice to have favorable landlord-tenant laws and a decent state tax environment. State and local income and property taxes can really eat into Real Estate IRA profits if you are not careful.

And lastly, since many of our clients are here in the southeastern United States, we’re also always looking for great spots that are close to family – especially grandchildren.

The editors of USA Today recently published a useful guide to the top ten suburbs for retirees, primarily using the following criteria:

  • Modest cost of living
  • Median home prices
  • Property tax rates

A number of towns here in the Southeast made the cut:

  • Bermuda Run, North Carolina

This charming town in Davie County is one of the most promising suburbs of Winston-Salem. The town was incorporated in 1999 as one of only three gated communities in the state to be designated an official municipality. It recently annexed the nearby Kinderton Village community.

Property taxes are very low at $1,666 per year, on average, based on a median home price of $167,450. Meanwhile, the population is quite affluent, with a mean household income of $108,558. So, there is lots of room for house prices to grow.

  • Plantation, Florida

This bustling Broward County suburb just west of Fort Lauderdale is an easy commute from downtown – just down Broward Boulevard. It is home to a lot of city employees and has homes available at a variety of price points.

Homes in this area are on the pricy side: The median home last year listed for $329,250, with property taxes adding an average of $4,122 to the annual cost of ownership. Incomes are relatively low, here, too, relative to house prices, with a mean household income of $79,797.

Florida has some benefits that could reflect well with investors.  The lack of a state income tax means you can enjoy more of the rental income your properties produce.  Florida is also very friendly to investors, from a bankruptcy protection perspective. This is important for Self-Directed IRA investors, as real estate can generate liability if you are not careful – though assets within Real Estate IRAs are not generally considered personal assets at risk in the event of bankruptcy.

  • Fairfield Harbour, North Carolina

Fairfield Harbour, in Craven County, is a resort community near New Bern in beautiful coastal North Carolina. Among the chief attractions: The beautiful Fairfield Park golf course. Like Bermuda Run, it is a gated community. The median list price for Fairfield Harbour is $189,900 – well within the reach of the area’s mean household income of $65,903. Property tax is quite low at $1,343.

Fairfield Harbour and the nearby town of New Bern are two of the best kept secrets in America when it comes to affordable coastal living.

  • Sunset Beach, North Carolina

This upscale Brunswick County community sports median home listing prices of $324,900, making it one of the pricier areas in North Carolina. The town consists of two mainland neighborhoods and a barrier island, which has about 1,200 homes. The area is home to three golf courses – Oyster Bay, Sandpiper Bay and Sea Trail resort – and the developments around these courses represent the bulk of the residential real estate.

The mean household income in Sunset Beach is $70,992, which means many families are stretching to afford the homes they have now – especially more recent buyers.

Annual taxes of $1,348 make it among the lowest-tax communities on the list.  This is a plus for Real Estate IRA investors looking to relocate.

  • Timber Pines, Florida

This small community in Hernando County, Florida offers some of the best freshwater fishing in the country. The closest major cities are Tampa to the south, and Ocala, to the northeast. It is a popular destination for retirees, including many Real Estate IRA investors attracted by the year-round mild climate and the lack of state income taxes on rental income.

The median house price is quite modest for Florida, at $159,900, within easy reach for the average household in the area, which logs an income of $56,974 per year.

For more information on Self-Directed Real Estate IRAs, or to schedule a no-obligation consultation, visit our website at www.AmericanIRA.com. Or call us today at 866-7500-IRA (472).

We look forward to serving you.